Can’t Stop on the Kenai.

This fall has been incredible for fishing the Kenai. Maybe it is always like this. It seems like I made the right choice moving up here. We have made friends with our incredible neighbors and some seem even more fanatical about fly fishing than I am.

Dolly Varden and Rainbow Trout have been caught and released by us more times than I can count. Here are a few pictures of the events.Screen Shot 2017-10-03 at 12.31.48 PMScreen Shot 2017-10-03 at 12.32.24 PMScreen Shot 2017-10-03 at 12.31.29 PMScreen Shot 2017-10-03 at 12.33.23 PMScreen Shot 2017-10-03 at 12.32.49 PM

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Fly fishing the Kenai Peninsula.

Screen Shot 2015-10-03 at 7.02.47 PMI finally got to fish in the Kenai Peninsula. It has been on my bucket list for a while. Plenty of guys would come into Orvis in Bellevue talking about their trip to Alaska and how awesome it was to fish here. Now it is in my backyard. The salmon are everywhere. Dying, spawning, or somewhere in between. The trout were big, but not plentiful. They were hard enough to catch to make you work for them, but they were hanging out right where you would expect them. We didn’t see any bears and I’m not sure if I am disappointed or relieved. Alaska is amazing more and more each day. Fall has come quickly and I feel like there is a bit of a rush to get more fishing in before the weather gets worse.

Camping and fishing on the Sol Duc.

I had never really been to the Olympic Peninsula. A couple of stops at the ferry terminal in Port Angeles doesn’t really count. I still have not been to the Olympic National Park. Until I am allowed to take my dog wherever I want in the park, I probably won’t be going there. I found out about the Klahowya Campground and had to visit it. It is on the Olympic National Forest land making it cheaper and dog friendly. The drive along US 101 wasn’t very impressive until I turned off the highway and into the campsite. Tall trees shaded the whole area. The beautiful, low, clear, and cold Sol Duc River was flowing near a bunch of the campsites. We arrived hot and ready to fish. Before unloading the car, Lando and I need to see the water and take a selfie.Screen Shot 2014-07-12 at 2.16.44 PMThe trees are as enormous as you would expect them to be. With so few inhabitants, there aren’t many (if any) trails beside the rivers. This is half of the reason I went. Even though there are places where it is easily accessible, most people aren’t willing to leave the campgrounds. Ferns, moss, and berries were everywhere. the smell of Christmas was everywhere. It felt 20 degrees cooler once you were in the forest.Screen Shot 2014-07-12 at 2.17.20 PMFollowing the river, I came to a very deep hole. It would have been a great place to swim if it weren’t full of fish. I was sight casting to some of the largest wild trout I have seen in Washington. It was a bit of sketchy hike to get to this area. I had to remind myself that if either one of us got injured, it is a long walk back to the car and there still wouldn’t be cell service for another 15 miles.

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It is always good when you can’t hold the camera far enough away to get a decent picture. Watching this fish eat my fly, swim upstream, jump, swim downstream, and force me to scramble over logs and rocks was a thrill I won’t soon forget.Screen Shot 2014-07-12 at 2.18.08 PM Screen Shot 2014-07-12 at 2.18.21 PMThanks for reading and feel free to leave your comments!

Small stream fishing near Seattle, Washington.

We hit the Teanaway again. This time I brought a new crew of hooligans. Dan caught his first fish on a fly rod and as we explored more, we found water that looked more familiar and produced a lot more fish. This is a great place to wade for novice fly anglers and people looking to explore the beauty of the mountains without traveling far from Seattle.Screen shot 2013-07-19 at 11.27.28 PM Screen shot 2013-07-19 at 11.27.08 PM Screen shot 2013-07-19 at 11.27.19 PM

The next week (or something like that) I revisited Gold Pan Creek. The flows seemed lower than last year, but summer seemed to have started earlier this year and a little more earnestly. It was 80 degrees in May in 2013!

There were lots of small eager trout (a common theme in Western Washington), but no elusive Bull Trout that I keep hoping for. Of course, I have not specifically targeted them yet either.

panorama photo

Fishing the Teanaway River.

We fished the Teanaway River last week. It is less than 2 hours from Seattle, just outside the town of Cle Elum. It seems to get a lot of anglers as there are many “No Trespassing” signs. We hit the North Fork first and found some very small fish. We fished near a bridge which probably sees a lot of pressure. Luckily, we went mid week so we didn’t see any other anglers that day. It turned out to be a beautiful day and it is a great small stream to fish in the summer.Screen shot 2013-07-01 at 3.03.17 PMThe fields were full of flowers and Lando made sure to stop and smell as many as he could.
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There were plenty of bugs around and just like the forks of the Snoqualmie River, a size 14 Stimulator was magic. All of the small hungry fish were voraciously attacking flies on the surface.
Screen shot 2013-07-01 at 3.03.26 PM We fished the Middle Fork of the Teanway River later in the day and found it to be low, clear, and amazing. There were caddisflies all over the bottom. Bill is standing on the light colored bottom where there was a lot of fish food, but no fish to be found. We have to find the dark bottom to find the fish.Screen shot 2013-07-01 at 3.03.52 PMThis is a closer look at the bugs on the bottom of the creek.
Screen shot 2013-07-01 at 3.04.04 PMIt was a fantastic day of getting out of Seattle and fishing a new spot. I will be back. Thanks for reading and please leave your comments below.

Carpocalypse 2012

 

I love carp fishing. I haven’t had much success since moving to Seattle in landing any of them. Orvis helped sponsor a fun carp fishing tournament called, Carpocalypse. Being an employee, I didn’t actually try wasn’t eligible for any prizes. But who cares about the killer prizes?! It is a part of the state that I haven’t been to, so I was down for an adventure. I packed up the dog and we set off four hours to Banks Lake. We passed through the town of George, Washington. That always makes me giggle.

 

There is camping at the lake, but we decided to make it a one day trip. The people in the picture below seemed to find a lonely camp site at the end of the road.Mr. Miyawaki wandering the carp flats of Banks Lake.

It was a beautiful place. Really nice if you don’t mind ticks, rattlesnakes, mosquitoes that make you want to eat DEET, and sweat dripping down you constantly. It is also a great place if you want to see how the place used to be, but due to our growing need for electricity, we put the river where we wanted it. Fishing by a large dam for invasive fish is human ingenuity at its best.

 

Fishless, I headed home after letting Lando check for some fish.

I stopped at a few pull outs along the water to see what we could see. One of the more interesting was the damselfly breeding grounds. 

We also saw a car on fire.

I stopped in Cle Elum on the way home to stand in the cold water and try to stop sweating. Triple digit temperatures are not something that we are used to anymore. Lando is always wearing that black sweater, so I thought that he might appreciate some swift, cool water. I pulled out three fish each a littler larger and more beautiful than the previous one.

 

 

Outcast float tube.

Living so clase to Green Lake means that I always have an opportunity to fish. There is very little access from the banks and most places where you can cast a line has a bait chucker sitting in a chair waiting for the bell to ring that is attached to his fishin’ pole. My canoe takes two people to lift on and off of the car. So I sprung for an Outcast Fish Cat package. This has given me access to many trout and even more rock bass. I am waiting to spot my first carp from the tube.