Alaskan Steelhead

I just can’t seem to help myself. October rolls around and the thought of standing in cold water not catching anything gets very appealing. The previous year was very good to me. Catching 3 Steelhead on my first Alaskan outing made me feel like a pro. This year, the rivers was blown out.IMG_3755.jpgI was still able to manage to land one which required being out at the river before everyone else. It was cold and as the water level dropped, my expectations rose. The fishing was probably great the day after we left.IMG_3786.jpgThe drive home was beautiful. We stopped at Tern Lake to watch the swans. IMG_3775.jpgA couple of weeks later, I thought that the water level had dropped enough to make the fishing a little better. I knew that it would be cold, so I rented a hotel room instead of camping. I feel like I am getting older smarter.

The day started with a few feet of ice on the bank. It was tough to release fish without taking them out of the water. This Dolly Varden looks small compared to the giant bird prints in the ice. IMG_3822.jpgI realized that the old get up early trick might be in order. A few weeks ago there would be 6 people in the popular spots when the sun rose. This time I was the only one there. I did see one other person fishing, but he was walking over to the restaurant to get breakfast as I was heading to the river. It paid off.IMG_3834.jpgOne fish per day turned out to be the most I could get. It was more than I could ask for. I will be back next October to do it again.IMG_3829.jpg

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The beginning.

52 hikes in one year. I could have waited until January 1. Or maybe the start of a new month. But why wait for anything? There are so many hiking opportunities, I really don’t want to waste any free time. We have been hiking quite a bit and exploring our local parks, but I want to keep track of which hikes I have done. Here is where I will do that. This hike to Ship Lake might get done this summer.

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A lot of people in Alaska spend their winter planning their summer adventures. We were out skiing, fishing, and skijoring, so we are a little late in the game as far as planning things. There are lots of ideas floating around however. A lot of my time is spent looking at things like this.

crowpassSo stay tuned for at least 52 adventures this year. There are some loose rules for what makes a hike. At least 3 miles. All off road. Well at least not paved. Runs totally count. Snacks should be eaten on the trail. Serious things like these must be considered for it to be a true hike.