Tonsina Creek.

Hike 20/52 was to a place that is special to us. Leaving Lowell Point and heading towards Caines Head, you cross Tonsina Creek. From here, you can walk to the beach or continue through the woods. This was a trip of firsts for FN-2187. It was his first long car ride. His first creek crossing.20180301_141301.jpgHis first time to the beach.20180301_141520.jpgHis first time in the ocean.20180301_142332(0).jpgIMG_4375.jpgIMG_4379.jpgHe seemed to love all of his firsts, so we will make sure to bring him back in the summer!

Advertisements

Beach Lake, Chugiak.

Hike 19/52 was to Beach Lake in Chugiak. We have been here before in the summer and caught some trout. This time, it was snowy and everything was frozen. We had never walked out to the “beach” so we thought that we would check it out. There are lots of dog sled trails and icebergs moving in and out with the tides. As usual, we didn’t see anyone out there and that was fine with us.IMG_4341.jpg20180221_104702.jpg20180221_104124.jpg20180221_103455.jpgIMG_4340.jpg

Dear Sweet Obi.

Our little English Pointer, Obi Wan, passed away recently. We knew that he had dilated cardiomyopathy as he had fainted a few times. We took him to the vet and eventually a dog cardiologist and were given the bad news.  We hoped that we would have a little more time with him, but he lived a great life full of adventures. He taught us not to slow down unless you are cuddling with loved ones. He went to sleep one night, tucked in with a blanket over him. When we woke up, he had passed away and was in the same position. No suffering, no pain. We are sad that it happened, but he brightened our life while he was in it.IMG_3999.jpgIMG_4007.jpg

Birds: 3 Rory:0

Hike 17/52. this time, we took off towards Matanuska Peak. I had never been on this trail and I tend to stay away from “The Valley” as I don’t like meth or replacing car windows. For Obi’s happiness, I decided to risk it.

Screen Shot 2017-10-17 at 8.54.38 AM.pngIt is a steep hike in the typical Alaska fashion and covers 5,670 feet of elevation gain in 4 miles. When you turn around, the views keep getting better though.Screen Shot 2017-10-17 at 8.54.53 AM.pngEventually, we could see Matanuska Peak.Screen Shot 2017-10-17 at 8.55.16 AM.png

I can never quite capture the beauty in a picture. Our hike was slowed by me turning around and “oohing” and “aahhhing” to the dogs every few minutes.

Screen Shot 2017-10-17 at 8.55.49 AM.png

We saw one grouse on our return to the car. It flew far away very quickly. At least we saw one.

Screen Shot 2017-10-17 at 8.56.23 AM.png

Obi seemed to have a good time and that is all that matters.Screen Shot 2017-10-17 at 8.55.34 AM.png

Packrafting Portage.

Our awesome friends borrowed packrafts and invited us on an adventure. We loaded packrafts into our backpacks and drove to Whittier. It was our first time to Whittier and our first time through the Whittier Tunnel, I mean the Anton Anderson Memorial Tunnel. From ADoT:

Travel between Prince William Sound and Turnagain Arm has always been a vital part of life in Alaska, although modes and routes have continued to change. Chugach Eskimos have hunted and gathered in this area for thousands of years. They trekked over Portage Pass and Portage Glacier to trade and fight with the Athabaskan Indians of Cook Inlet. Many miners and prospectors also used Portage Pass to reach the gold fields of Cook Inlet and the Kenai Peninsula in the late 19th century. Often dropped off at the head of Passage Canal, these adventurers used pack trains, sleds, and pulleys to drag equipment and supplies over Portage Pass in hopes of striking it rich in Cook Inlet or on the Kenai Peninsula. During this period, Portage Glacier still covered most of Portage Lake. Travelers climbed to Portage Pass and traversed the eastern edge of Portage Glacier to Bear Valley. From there they would walk the front of the glacier onto the base of Begich Peak and drop down to Portage Valley.

map showing approximate prospectors route

This route, however, was both difficult and dangerous. In 1914 the Alaska Railroad Corporation began to consider ways to construct a railroad spur to what is now the town of Whittier. While railroad manager Otto Ohlson championed this route because of its ability to provide a shortcut to a deep-water port (a trip to Seward added 52 more miles), this route didn’t become a reality until World War II. The main advantages of using Whittier as a rail port was that it was a shorter voyage, reduced exposure of ships to Japanese submarines, reduced the risk of Japanese bombing the port facilities because of the bad weather, and avoided the steep railroad grades required to traverse the Kenai Mountains.

Screen Shot 2017-10-09 at 8.11.35 AM.png

In 1941, the U.S. Army began construction of the railroad spur from Whittier to Portage. This line became Alaska’s main supply link for the war effort. Anton Anderson, an Army engineer, headed up the construction. The tunnel currently bears his name.

On April 23, 1943 workers completed the spur, which consisted of a 1-mile tunnel through Begich Peak and a 2.5-mile tunnel through Maynard Mountain, thus linking Whittier to the Alaska Railroad’s main line at Portage.

With a new rail connection to Whittier, the area began to change. In the mid-1940s, work crews and supply ships began to arrive, and population, including military and civilian personnel, swelled to over 1,000. Infrastructure—such as buildings (including the six story Buckner building and the Begich Tower), a power plant, and a petroleum tank farm—began to change the landscape.Screen Shot 2017-10-09 at 8.11.53 AM.png

The 1950s brought change to Whittier once again. As the military pulled out, Whittier transformed into a federally run commercial port. This turn of events also provided the opportunity for the private ownership and development potential that exists today.

Arriving in Whittier meant beautiful views of the marina from the local coffee shop. The best way to keep people out of Whittier is to repeat the mantra, “It is always shittier in Whittier”.

Screen Shot 2017-10-09 at 8.12.08 AM.png

After a brief tour of the whole town, we began our hike.Screen Shot 2017-10-09 at 8.12.25 AM.pngIt is a short and steep hike. Packs were loaded with boats, lunch, paddles, clothes, and snacks.

Screen Shot 2017-10-09 at 8.13.20 AM.pngScreen Shot 2017-10-09 at 8.12.51 AM.png

As we crested the summit our merry band of travelers enjoyed the views and the walk in the mountains.Screen Shot 2017-10-09 at 8.13.39 AM.pngThe end of the trail was stunning.Screen Shot 2017-10-09 at 8.13.59 AM.pngScreen Shot 2017-10-09 at 8.14.17 AM.pngScreen Shot 2017-10-09 at 8.14.42 AM.pngWe had a quick lesson on how to inflate the boat, wear a dry suit, and try to go in a forward direction. Then we were off.Screen Shot 2017-10-09 at 8.15.11 AM.pngScreen Shot 2017-10-09 at 8.15.33 AM.png

We paddled across the lake until we found the outlet. Then we floated and paddled downstream to where the river meets Turnagain Arm. It was an incredible adventure that made me appreciate the outdoors and Alaska’s beauty even more.

Birds: 1 Rory :0

Feeling semi confident with my bow, I am looking for places where I can hunt small game. Having two hunting dogs, it seems that I should take them and put them to good use. One area open to hunting that isn’t too far away is the Powerline trail. Screen Shot 2017-10-04 at 4.42.16 PM.png

Near Indian Valley, hunting is allowed. I headed over there for my first time on the far end of the trail.

Screen Shot 2017-10-04 at 4.42.24 PM.png

It was a beautiful hike and I was too low in elevation to get to any ptarmigan. I think. That is what I tell myself. We did not see any birds. At least I got some steps in. And is was hike 15/52.Screen Shot 2017-10-04 at 4.42.04 PM.png