Hooligan Fishing.

Hooligan (Thaleichthys pacificus), otherwise known as “eulachon” or “candlefish”, are a type of anadromous smelt that makes its way into a number of rivers in Alaska during the spring spawning run. They arrive in some river systems in the hundreds of thousands, and are an important forage species for eagles, gulls, bears and other species. The fish is found from the Pacific Northwest to Alaska, and the name “eulachon” is thought to derive from the Chinookan language. “Hooligan” is thought to be a derivative of the Chinookan name.Screen Shot 2017-05-29 at 9.56.57 AM.png

Hooligan are of interest to subsistence fishermen, who net them out of rivers in the spring. The fish are eaten dried, smoked, canned or pan-fried. In years past, they earned the name “candlefish”, because when dried, the oil content of the fish was sufficient to allow it to burn like a candle. Hooligan were formerly harvested and rendered for their oil, which can comprise 15% of their body weight during the spawning run.Screen Shot 2017-05-29 at 9.57.06 AM.png

Hooligan make their spawning run in May, with the males usually coming in first, followed by female fish a few days later. Males develop two fleshy ridges along their sides, and most hooligan die after spawning. They lay their eggs in sand or gravel, and the eggs hatch in roughly a month. The fry make their way to saltwater immediately, where they live for four to six years. They do not always return to the same stream where they were spawned, but they do return to the general area. They prefer slower rivers without a lot of current velocity, as they are fairly weak swimmers.Screen Shot 2017-05-29 at 9.57.53 AM.png

Hooligan average between eight and ten inches in size.Screen Shot 2017-05-29 at 9.58.21 AM.png

Hooligan are typically caught by dipnet, a long-handled net with a bag that has fine mesh in it. The fish school up in deeper pockets, and in these places hundreds of hooligan can be caught. At this writing, a dipnetting permit is not required, and anyone with a valid sport fishing license can catch hooligan. There is no bag limit on hooligan.

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Cheap food, not fast food.

I am constantly hearing that it is cheaper to eat from a fast food value menu than it is to eat food from a grocery store. I don’t believe it. This is a fantastic article from Reddit.

HOW TO EAT WHEN TIMES ARE VERY TIGHT

Q: I need to eat very cheaply until I can find more work. So I need your help. Should I just eat crappy cheap noodles every meal? Or can I eat better and a bit healthier for not much more cost?

A: The trick to mundane food that is purely for cheap nourishment is to make it different every time, and eat it at a pretty place.

first: eat it at a pretty place. even if it’s crap. take it somewhere. a park, a lake, a river or pond. take it to the roof. eat it in your back yard.

noodles: pesto. chicken and pesto. chicken and a milk/flour/butter sauce. lemon pepper with mayonaise (it sounds weird, but tastes great. this is a macaroni type dish)

rice: rice with milk, sugar and cinnamon. rice with vegetables. rice with butter and salt and an egg. rice with cheese and butter.

use ground beef when you cook with meat that isn’t chicken, and never spend more than 3 dollars per pound on it. actually, if you can find any other meat that is 2 per pound, have them grind it at the counter. then you can put small amounts of meat in food and make it seem hearty.

chicken should be the thing you eat most of as meat is concerned. it’s the cheapest. look for it for a dollar fifty per pound. don’t buy it for much more than that.

potatoes. mashed potatoes, baked potatoes. cut potatoes up and put them in your soups. hash browns in the morning, or chunks with spices and eggs. fries for lunch. cook it with cheese. put it in your rice (hint… throw EVERYTHING in rice… together)

eggs. throw eggs in your ramen. put eggs in your rice. put eggs in your soups.

water. drink a lot of it at every meal.

oatmeal. for every breakfast, and every snack. make sure you splurge on brown sugar, it makes it worth it.

bread. make it yourself. one cup warm water. two tablespoons sugar, two teaspoons yeast (or one package) a quarter cup oil, some salt, and three cups flour. bake it at 350 for a half hour. Flavor it with cinnamon and sugar, or chocolate chips. put dill in it with pepper and garlic powder (I fucking hate garlic, but other people seem to like it) substitute a half cup flour with oatmeal.

eggs with onions, green beans, and chili powder. eat it with tortillas. tortillas: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/homemade-flour-tortillas/ this recipe is alright. instead of lard I use a quarter cup oil, and a little less water. tweak it as you go if you want, or follow it exactly. not just green beans and eggs…. but also re-fried beans with eggs in a tortilla.

yogurt. just buy the one thing. make sure it’s active. put it in any gallon of milk that is going bad. the next day you’ll have yogurt. keep the culture alive and put it in milk. that’s like…2 dollars for a GALLON of yogurt.

make your own laundry detergent. look up recipes online. super cheap. does a reasonable job.

use margarine instead of butter. better yet… just use vegetable oil and salt in your recipes instead.

Bananas. they’re super cheap for fruit. you can get bananas for like… fifty cents per pound. think about that for a second. you can fill yourself on fruit. eat five pounds of it…… two dollars, fifty cents.

when water is hard to drink because everything is tasteless from being miserable and poor…. make kool-aide. cherry kool-aide goes well with rice.

tuck your chin. toughen up. go out every day and do your damnedest to get yourself a job. come home tired, boil up a big plate of pasta, mix in tomato sauce and cheese… and go out to your pretty place to eat it and cry. remember these feelings. remember what foods got you through. remember how cheaply you lived, and how easy it was. when you have a job again…. .this is pretty much how you should eat anyway. with a few adjustments. this diet fed my family of four for a long time. it cost me about a hundred dollars per month. that included shopping for discounts, and sometimes trying to treat ourselves to butter. or cheese that wasn’t “economy muenster”

remember your meals though, remember who ate them with you. remember who got you by the best. hold on to that person. they will know more about you than anyone you happen to tell your story to.

oh, and don’t be ashamed if you need a little help from a food pantry or anything… just be sure to donate back to it when you’re back on your feet. that’s what it’s there for, and people like you, who use it when they’re down are always loyal donators.

November 10th – Food.

Here is a recap of what the onslaught of posts have been about this month:

Thanksgiving is an interesting holiday. People celebrate it for many reasons. Being thankful is probably one of the better reasons. I don’t give thanks to a spiritual being. My thanks come from all of my real world experiences. I would like to try and focus on one memory or experience every day this month and highlight them here. I (and most people reading this) have many things to be thankful about. Life can almost always be worse. The healthcare world is a fierce reality of death and dying. Especially when you are at the bottom of the barrel like a nursing student seems to be sometimes.

So today’s post is about something very important to me. Food.

A cheeseburger is one of my favorite things to eat. Here is one from Tamarack Brewery in Missoula, Montana. Rock Creek, I love you.

Screen shot 2013-11-10 at 11.17.54 AM Raclette from Paris.Screen shot 2013-11-10 at 11.15.49 AMBreakfast in Napoli.
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Pot muffins in Amsterdam.Screen shot 2013-11-10 at 11.16.38 AM

Crème brûlée because I can’t find anyone that makes it as perfect as my ex step..nevermind. Patricia, yours is still the best.
Screen shot 2013-11-10 at 11.16.02 AMThe good thing is that my enabler makes a spread like this for camping!

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Deadliest Catch, Seattle Washington.

Aboard the “Greenwood Guppy” we heard rumors of good crabbing areas near Seattle. Funnily enough, the tips came from some people working with Elizabeth Swann when she was in town. She is no longer a pirate.

Keepers.

Keepers.

So we paddle out in the Guppy (the canoe in all of our pictures), drop our pots with bait like salmon heads and tails from Fresh Fish Co., and then go home. The next day, the pots were full of hundreds eleven crabs. The Dungeness (Dungies) have to be male and 6 1/4 inches. We tossed back a couple of small guys. We also released all of the females.

Black tipped claws!

Black tipped claws!

Chef Ed (I know a couple of those) is preparing the crab the same day that we caught them. Tomorrow, we are headed out to collect the pots again. It feels a bit like observing, except this time it is fun!

Chicken coop rain barrel waterer.

First we made a roof that would direct the water to the new gutters.

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The gutters drain into a bucket. Rain barrels are becoming common enough that Home Depot has devices to make it easy to make your own.Screen shot 2013-04-01 at 9.51.11 AMThe bucket drains out of the far corner. We had to drill a hole in the bucket and push a piece of PVC through that would hold the tubing we have left over from the aquaponic wall garden. We found the buckets outside on trash day as the neighbors seem to go through a lot of cat litter.Screen shot 2013-04-01 at 9.51.24 AMRunning along the wire.

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The tube then is connected to a PVC pipe with a cap.Screen shot 2013-04-01 at 9.51.33 AMThe last step is to install the nipple waterers!

Chicken coop.

Every homesteader needs a chicken coop. We had a shed that housed firewood despite our house not have any wood burning capabilities. I suppose there is an elevated fire pit outside that we use twice a year, but nothing that warrants half a cord of wood to be kept dry all year long. Here is the picture before:IMG_2660There were a couple of vegetable boxes that held some weeds and green onions, so we took them apart and moved them next to the street in the front of the house so that they might get some sun. Then we planted peas, kale, lettuce, and cilantro. Then we built a chicken coop. I have step by step pictures and one day I may put them all together. We re-did the roof so that we can collect rain water and have an automatic watering system. The feeder is also pretty cool, but I am going to make sure that it will work before I post the details about it.

Here is the picture after:IMG_2841There are only a few steps left before we get chickens. There is a lot of interest locally of raising chickens as well as vertical gardens.

Vertical aquaponic wall garden.

I am damn near finished. There are always small details to fix, but the major stuff is finished. I built a shelf for the fish tank, made a light, and put it all together. The light was my first time playing with electrical things. It felt good to see the light come on without me getting electrocuted. Thanks to TomorrowsGarden.net for showing me how to save $100 by making my own light. It was about $15 to make the light and another $20 for both light bulbs. Typically, these reflectors are about $100 without the bulbs.

photo 3Here is the light after being mounted to the ceiling.
photo 1Now we need more plants.
photo 2The fish poop and fertilize the plants. I got the idea from other aquaponic companies, but really didn’t want to pay what they were charging for complete setups. Amanda hates all of the wires, so those will be hidden somehow and then I will really be finished… until we work on the next one beside it.