Barber Cabin.

In February, we started planning our summer activities. We found that the Barber Cabin was available for a couple of nights in the middle of May. To us, summer is May, June, and July, no matter what the weather is doing. These are the best times to have nice weather.

I packed up the dogs and gear for a couple of days and headed out to the Kenai Peninsula. It has been pretty grey and rainy for the beginning of our summer. I was excited to get out of town.img_4681

It is a short and easy walk to the cabin. I was testing out having Finn carry some supplies. The boys did well. I was careful not to overpack their packs for the first hike of the season. Finn was unsure until he saw his first grouse. Then he completely forgot that he had a pack on his back.img_4682

I had left Anchorage in the rain and it was grey, windy, and sporadically raining on the trail. The trail is wide and mostly flat. The cabin is almost accessible by wheelchair.img_4684When we arrived, the cabin was warm and the stove still had some heat in it. That is a great feeling. Thanks to the people that I passed on the trail. They were hunting bears and like wire haired pointers. Life in Alaska.img_4720We didn’t see any bears which I found surprising. Of course, two loud dogs with bear bells may have helped alert the cautious Ursidae. There is allegedly good fishing in the lake. The cabin was conveniently close to the lake and canoe is provided in the cabin rental. When the wind picked up, there were whitecaps on the lake and we hunkered down in the cabin. When the wind slowed, Lando showed Finn how to fetch things in the water. Finn is still apprehensive about swimming.img_4727-effectsWe took the canoe out on the lake during a calm spell. We didn’t catch or see any fish. We did see a moose swim across the lake. That got Finn excited enough to stand on the bow.img_4714This is a great cabin that is easily accessed. Check it out after fishing the Russian River. The Russian Lakes Trail looks like another place to explore more this summer.img_4713

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Yakutat, AK. Day 4.

I woke up feeling slightly defeated knowing that we were leaving on this day. We had not caught a fish. Most of the fish were in the lower half of the river. We were up at the upper portion of the river. We had not fished above the bridge yet so we thought that we would give it a shot before our trip to the airport. There was so much good looking water, but just no fish. That isn’t entirely true. We saw a few fish. Sight fishing to these beasts is quite exhilarating. We walked and walked. We fished and fished. Nothing happened. We gave up. We headed back to camp to have lunch, pack everything away, and head to the airport.IMG_4522.jpgWe arrived at the infamous nine mile bridge. There were a couple of guys fishing it that had been there since about 5 am. They were taking a break, so I stepped in. I had a couple of follows from some big fish which made my heart race. I switched to a fly that I have to most confidence in. We call it, “The Magic Fly”. I was working it hard. A guide stepped in and told me how few fish were caught on the flies from the bridge area. He also handed me a fly that he thought would work. It looked very similar to my magic fly. We laughed about our taste in flies. It gave me a little more confidence. In the 11th hour. I hooked up.IMG_4523.jpgIt all came together. Caught, pictures, release. Now I can return home with a smile on my face. Now we are planning our return for next year. Hopefully, just like this steelhead.IMG_4535-ANIMATION.gif

Winter is coming, maybe.

It has been a rather warm fall, but the snow is here to stay and we are acting accordingly.rory12.jpgThe sunrises and sunsets are incredible with our shorter days and longer nights.IMG_3943.jpgThe walks with the dogs require us getting more and more bundled up as the temps drop. The dogs need to keep moving to stay warm.IMG_3953.jpgWe are able to take our fat bikes to more locations as the snow settles in. This is the Middle Earth trail in Kincaid Park. One of our favorites.IMG_3963.jpgLando braves the cold runs with me and never complains.IMG_3968.jpg

Booties are sometimes necessary for skijoring.IMG_3975.jpg

Alaskan Steelhead

I just can’t seem to help myself. October rolls around and the thought of standing in cold water not catching anything gets very appealing. The previous year was very good to me. Catching 3 Steelhead on my first Alaskan outing made me feel like a pro. This year, the rivers was blown out.IMG_3755.jpgI was still able to manage to land one which required being out at the river before everyone else. It was cold and as the water level dropped, my expectations rose. The fishing was probably great the day after we left.IMG_3786.jpgThe drive home was beautiful. We stopped at Tern Lake to watch the swans. IMG_3775.jpgA couple of weeks later, I thought that the water level had dropped enough to make the fishing a little better. I knew that it would be cold, so I rented a hotel room instead of camping. I feel like I am getting older smarter.

The day started with a few feet of ice on the bank. It was tough to release fish without taking them out of the water. This Dolly Varden looks small compared to the giant bird prints in the ice. IMG_3822.jpgI realized that the old get up early trick might be in order. A few weeks ago there would be 6 people in the popular spots when the sun rose. This time I was the only one there. I did see one other person fishing, but he was walking over to the restaurant to get breakfast as I was heading to the river. It paid off.IMG_3834.jpgOne fish per day turned out to be the most I could get. It was more than I could ask for. I will be back next October to do it again.IMG_3829.jpg