Day Three – Crossing Johnstone Strait.

We woke up only slightly dejected, but ready for whatever the day threw at us. And then we experienced the fog. In the back of both of our minds, we still wanted to cross Johnstone Strait. But we had to do it safely. This fog prevented any crossing of the straight. It was so thick, that we put our headlamps on so that we could see each other. We had to hug the shore as we headed east. Johnstone Strait is known as the Alaska Marine Highway. Crossing it in heavy fog is dangerous in a small kayak.

Just another beautiful day.

Just another beautiful day.

The water was very calm and the animals were very quiet. It was a bit eerie. Even the fishing boats had come in overnight and anchored in a small bay near where we had camped. Bad weather was predicted so we were a little nervous that it might be getting worse than we had expected.

Safe place bay.

Safe place bay.

As the day wore on, the sun got brighter and the weather seemed to improve. There was still no wind, but we could see more trees. We could take off our headlamps and see each other. It was the first time we saw how beautiful the northern part of Vancouver Island really is.

Gorgeous countryside.

Gorgeous countryside.

We became more brave as the visibility improved. We had been pedaling for a couple miles and were feeling pretty good. We pulled into a cove, looked at our GPS, and made a decision to try and cross the strait. If it looked sketchy at any point, we would turn around. What happened? Nothing. We had the calmest water we had seen so far. The fog lifted and we chased it away!

Calm water.

Calm water.

As we crossed Johnstone Strait, the sun came out and we had blue skies following us. We were giddy as we approached our new destination, Hanson Island.

Lando and I crossing the strait.

Lando and I crossing the strait.

We landed at Hanson Island and pulled our kayaks onto the beach. We celebrated with lunch and sat on the rocks in the sunshine smiling from ear to ear. Just when we thought things couldn’t get any better, there was a loud “psssshhhhh” just offshore. We were standing on the rocks looking into the depths and a whale was passing within 15 yards of us. We watched it for a few breaths with our mouths open before Amanda was smart enough to yell, “get your camera!”

Just another whale.

Just another whale.

Goodbye.

Goodbye.

He cruised by as we remembered to finish our lunch. The winds started picking up and the currents began moving again. We were quickly reminded that the rain was supposed to appear the next day and we needed to find a campsite that we could hunker in if we couldn’t paddle/pedal.

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